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. but, mr. president, i just want to say that i wholeheartedly support her in this position. there's a loft work that needs to -- there's a lot of work that needs to take place at f.h.a. i think she's somebody that has the ability to carry that out. and the biggest issue with f.h.a. right now, candidly, is this body and the folks down the hallway passing legislation to deal with overall housing finance. i know senator isakson from georgia's going to be very involved in that. i hope to be involved with that. my guess is the presiding officer is going to be involved in that. and yet today, my sense is we need to go ahead and have someone who's actually running f.h.a. to cause it to work better. and i hope my colleagues on this side of the aisle, as many as can, will join in, give her strong support today and then work closely with her to cause f.h.a. to be the kind of place that it ought to be. and it certainly -- i agree with the senator from georgia -- shouldn't have the market share that it has today. but a big part of that, again, a big part of that has to do with our inaction in
washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington? bill clinton is not the first and not the worst in petraeus is not the first for the worse. in there ,-com,-com ma done that and there's a long history in infected pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. the details are sketchy and there's not a lot of letters written about this but here is what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua. >> speed and speed was as dashing and handsome and quote unquote lucky with the ladies as lincoln was unlucky and awkward and romance. speed felt sorry for lincoln in the eyes called each other by their last names, speed them again and speed invited lincoln to work in his general store and he didn't have a place to say so he
brennan recounts the life of the former first lady who died in 1993. ms. brennan discusses her use of mrs. nixon's recently released private documents. this is just under 50 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul and i'm the acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk recitations. today, we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who is by the way of warren 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, did much who did much of her research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement and she has written to date, three different books those being turning right at the 60's, conservator capture of the gop, wives, mothers and the conservative women conservative women in the crusade against communism and of course the book we love the most around here which is "pat nixon" embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward to -- i w
marion for a third time. mrs. alexander did know about that when i told her she said she wasn't surprised that her grandfather said that he was the jim dandy and that characterization in her mind went along with this idea that at 71 he would marry for a third time. she told me the family story of how he learned to read and write. he learned in the presence of the little master or the white boy. this might well have been dolley's son payne todd who would be the object of the instruction and jennings would be standing to the side but listening and absorbing and learning. in the book i presented perhaps the first instance of jennings taking advantage of his position. he was the good listener and a good network. there are so many places he was associated with that are extent in washington today. one of them is not his own house. his own house located where else street and 18 intercept. some of you may remember until very recently was border's books and i would go there and i would go into the cafe. i was sitting in my coffee thinking i could be at paul jennings's kitchen table right now and u
officer: the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: may i thank the senator from maryland, as always, for her usual courtesy and i think she had a very important message and i appreciate not only the words themselves but her eloquence and passion. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the senator from south carolina be included in a colloquy during my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i, like i believe all of us just finished watching the president's remarks at -- i guess it was the executive office building. and i'm not sure yet as i sort out my impressions of the president's remarks as to whether to be angry or to be saddened. i've been around this town for a number of years, and as is well known, i had an interest in the presidency more than academic and i've watched a lot of presidents, going back to president reagan from the standpoint of a member of congress. and i've watched these other crises as we go through them, whether it be the potential shutdown of the government when newt gingrich was speaker of the house, we've seen these other
the wife--his wife found out. in one of her diaries, it says, one day, 'spoke to p. about mrs. r.,' and that's the last mention of mrs. r. in mrs. morgan's diaries. so i think that was a fairly dramatic moment. he then had to kind of keep it more secret, and he was not--it's interesting, he was--he lived very--he was much more of a european than an american puritan about all this. the european aristocrats had mistresses. they would travel to other friends' country houses, they would stay in european hotels. they trusted their friends not to talk. it was sort of accepted, especially in the prince of wales' set. he had these women with him, he traveled, and everybody knew about it, and nobody really talked about it. and i think morgan sort of did more or less the same thing. but once his wife found out, it was a problem. and the other problem was that this mrs. randolph was relatively young and not wealthy and she needed a husband, and morgan was not going to get divorced. so a rather convenient solution came along. another prominent american man of their world was william c. whitn
for washington as we can secure yousef in the white house. johnson says no. i am not leaving until mrs. kennedy leaves with me. so we can get her back to washington. won't leave without her husband's body. johnson's as we go to the plane and wait for her and the body there. calm and decisive as if he thought everything through in a moment, that scene on the plane when he gets to the plane also haven't been described from his point of view. we all know the photograph, lyndon johnson standing with his hand up, jacqueline kennedy standing next to him, ladybird on the other side, the judge with the bible administering the oath. it hadn't been told from johnson's point of view and i wanted to do that so for the -- to do that i will talk to everyone who is alive and who was in that room. i talked to mary famer who was johnson's secretary. if you look at that iconic photograph, in the back behind the people you see the top of the young woman sort of curly black head, that is a marie famer's head. what she is doing she told me is checking that johnson takes the oath of office, she is checking to make s
that it is. we really can do without her leadership and support. also, my colleague, mr. tom mcnaught. the work that we have done to not be possible without him. but after the assassination, the taping was dismantled. and everyone said that the secretary mood of the executive office building. the tapes went to a variety of storage locations. robert kennedy actually used them for his book, "thirteen days". there is the reel to reel tapes and the dictaphone. 1983 so we have the first opening, and it is really a fact that the system was actually installed and 62, and 2012, we open and declassify the very last tape. but the entire collection is now open. this book that he had worked on is was the first one to include all of the tapes. >> and if one of these fine people want to go browsing, where would they go? they would go here. >> that's right. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still com
of 18 pay. -- 35 he is egger to win a conviction. by this time mrs. thorton is going forward and come to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and, you know, she
company and says mr. jefferson nine sorry i'm late. and her head explodes because this is supposed to be the embodiment of everything that is wrong in american life, and she just found him to be the most gracious man she had ever met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic and the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone is going to tell him who voted. maybe he is already starting on the next one. but i want to talk a little bit -- jefferson the politician, jefferson the renaissance man, jefferson the symbol, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, franklin roosevelt wanted him for the new deal and world war ii, he's like winston churchill in the bible he can be used in any way that you need partly because he was so articulate and so proliferate. 20,000 or more letters. brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of it? this is the man, the human being we have, and that's what i always wa
and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to this battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just you can walking around the white house ground i am constantly reminded about
she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household,
: without objection, so ordered. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. this being probably the last opportunity i will have to do this, but to thank her again for the extraordinary partnership we have had for more than a decade now on the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, and it's really meaningful to me that we have this last opportunity to do something together across party lines that we believe and hope will be in our national interests. i thank the chair, and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from maine is recognized. ms. collins: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i'm pleased to join the chairman of the homeland security committee, senator joe lieberman, in submitting for the congressional record our investigative report on the terrorist attack against the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, that claimed the lives of four americans who were serving our country. this report is indeed the last initiative that the chairman and i will produce together. it is the final work product of ten years of cooperation and collaboration and was authored in the s
to get to, drawing a line but she -- before she met mr. right she met mr. wrong and for have a year they had relationship but he didn't get along with her daughter, didn't give him the ok and that led to strain and as he was going out the door, by mutual agreement, he said i am going back on match.com and find someone just like you. and she thought wait a minute. he thinks there is a facsimile of me out there, that i am like a box of cereal. he has to go back -- to dial 7 and pull out someone just like me. so she felt -- okay, she was using this market rhetoric as an orientation to help her get to a human intimate life goal but that this guy had actually gone gold way and was seeing her in a market like way. and she said no, she recoiled, she drew the line. that is alienated. by drawing a line where she is basically doing is saying one side of this line, i will be the emotionally caring, i will be emotionally engaged, i will be attached emotionally to those around me. on the other side of the line i will be detached. nothing wrong with the attachment in its context. the market is a
mentioned, barack obama the story, but to be traveled to kenya with mr. marinus. we did a lot of taping over there, so you can see all of that in the special we did on her website, booktv.org. use the search function in the upper left hand corner watch some of the footage. it was quite a trip to kenya to see that background. yes, sir. >> guest: one of the great person is reporting reporting was he deconstruct it obama's memoir, faith of our fathers. dreams from our fathers. i think i got john mccain -- i had the fathers part right. which he wrote and 95 or so. 95 or 96. marinus went back to less accurate in the book, so it's a great companion to read if you read obama's memoir. >> host: there's some publishers, sentinel cognitive umt, that put out a budget anti, david limbaugh the great destroyer, i am the change and do nice to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obam
describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquen
reminded her fannie mae was no longer government agency was supposed to be managing its affairs. mrs. harris friend legislation to try to restore more government control over fannie mae. under tried sending flowers to mrs. harris and even a box of fannie mae chocolate's. she sent an back. she said if she ate those chocolates she would become as fast as the profits at fannie mae. the two sides came to a compromise. the department of housing and urban development set goals for fannie's financing of mortgages for poor people if that part of the business ever fell below a certain level. oakley hunter's people figured they had snookered mrs. harris because they promised to do only what they would have done anyway but a precedent had been set. the government could impose quotass on fannie mae. ronald reagan's turn. it was morning in america. peter wallace and was a young whippersnapper in the treasury. surely president reagan would finish the job getting the government completely out of the mortgage business. there was even a perfect pretext. fannie mae was losing money at that time, $1 mi
. [applause] i hope all of you will join me and keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country and we all cherish her as she continued to play a role at the library. i could come here and not mention nancy for at least a moment. i also want to say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years have been mayor of san diego to u.s. senator, to governor to a leader and a variety of ways. and the tequila scrape people who represent a willingness to serve their state in an important way. it's always engaged when you rub there. thank you poker serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i did maybe with us, but were thrilled to have you. we have an american legacy book tour. our very fond of the library as you know someone made a movie called ronald reagan and i want to recognize tonight kevin knobloch and his wife randi. or i was thrilled to be a cabin because such a great job. so we come back to the reagan library from a unique background and you may wonder
leadership on all these adoption issues senator landrieu has shown and look forward to working with her and others as we try to help right this tragic wrong. and i would be glad to yield to my good friend from louisiana. the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i am proud to join my friend, the senator from missouri, on the floor to add voice to this travesty that has recently occurred. the senator from missouri described the situation accurately, that a country that claims to be a powerful nation on the earth has decided to take powerful action against the weakest, most vulnerable individuals on the earth. and those are children without families. it makes no sense whatsoever for the country of russia to take the action that they did, because they're in a disagreement with us here in america, and maybe others around the world, about human rights violations regarding adults. the russian government in front of the whole world has taken that out, their anger and frustration, on their own children. their own children, who are orphans, their
is your favorite one now? >> the one that we used to go to mrs. then san francisco where one of my daughters' lives. they closed but she found another one and the name might cannot remember but it is on the main drag right before her city hall i will think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i enjoyed your book american stories i a understand only basically they were derived from newspaper headlines? >> from going to wherever i was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines maybe that is how i found out about them? >> there must have an idea is you pursued that did not turn into a story. were there any that came out of the process? >> i went to a place because somebody phone to me or wrote to me a letter i usually ended up with that story. almost always been just about everything is in their better or worse. >> do you have any insight with u.s. providence -- president has of preference for a dog as a family pet? [laughter] maybe they never met a cat that they like. [applause] more questions? >> as a little christmas gift could you give us
the end of the summer pickup were to carson and her asian was not going to publish the chapter. they were going to publish township tours. the effect that was enormous. before this year by mrs. published as a book, he was destined to be a bestseller, which it did and it turned carson immediately into a household name and as i said earlier, one of the most famous writers in america. the sea around us was number one on "the new york times" bestseller list for 39 straight weeks. it was on the bestsellers list for several years interesting at the time of the top 10, her publisher decided to reissue the earlier book from 1841 called under the sea wind, the one that disappeared without a trace it onto the bestseller lists for a period of time, rachel carson had two of the top 10 books in america at the same time on the bestseller list. the sea around us from the national book award, which is in its infancy at the time. the second or third time it has been awarded yet this is a picture at the awards banquet with the other winners that year. on the far left is mary ann moore to run for poetry and
close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] >> i did not you would be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here. callista and i have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know, and we made a movie called ronald reagan -- i want to recognize tonight kevin and his wife are here. kevin w
. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with cynthia lowen. she talks about her book, "bully," an action plan to combat the bullying crisis. and we conclude tonight's prime time coverage with john meacham. in his biography of thomas jefferson, mr. meacham reports despite mr. jefferson's strong beliefs, he was able to successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. that all happens tonight on c-span2's booktv. >> and now patrick tyler talks about the influence that israeli military leaders have had in shaping israeli government policy since the country's founding. this is about an hour, 20 minutes. [background sounds] >> good afternoon. welcome to the new america foundation, i'm peter bergen. it's really my pleasure to introduce patrick tyler, a man who doesn't need introduction. he's author of multiple books on china, the middle east and most recently the excellent new book, "fortress israel," which is a really excellent account of the last several decades of the kind of israeli national security establishment and, obviously, of considerable interest right now given
to basically figure his or her route properly. >> host: we are talking with andrew blum, the author of "tubes" the journey to the center of the internet and the staff wired -- staff writer at "wired" magazine. mr. blum you described a company as an internet backbone company. what is that? >> guest: they own very large physical pieces of the internet. they operate on a global network meaning, they have rights, strands of glass alongside a road or a railroad track and more importantly, they then owned this optical equipment that illuminates the fibers that transmit the data. and they sell that to anyone who is interested. it could be another network. it could be a large government organization and the government is level 3 major customer about what they are doing is essentially, they are the ones who are allowing the internet to the global. they're the ones making a long-distance the long-distance connections and they're the base layer that allows all of the other more familiar network names that everybody knows, the facebook's in the googles to write on top of that. >> host: andrew blum, if so
would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. watch tonight at 7:30 eastern and pacific on c-span3's american history the. tv. >> next, william silver and former federal reserve chairman paul volcker talk about mr. volcker's life and years of government service. it's about an hour and a half. [applause] >> that was very nice. you didn't tell me there were so many people here. so i have a sneaky suspicion that you're not here just to listen to me, so i'm going to be very brief, 13 minutes on a 300-page book. and i'm going to give you some background, and i'm going to give you some substance. the background starts with the title of the book. the title of the book is the first thing you see, but it's the last thing that we do, and when we put our heads together at bloomsbury press to create a title for this book, we thought about a number of alternatives. in a shameless attempt to capitalize on the volcker rule, i tried the semi-biblical volcker know thy enemy. [laughter] now, that was rejected as too narrow. i m
the american taxpayer. mrs. galante has demonstrated her ability to identify the multitude of problems of the f.a.a. and i believe it is incumbent upon us to reject in nomination and demand real forms at f.h.a. and a nominee who represents and appreciates the urgency of this situation and a willingness to address it. mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corker: i very much enjoy working with the senator from alabama. he's been outstanding on the banking committee and i agree with almost every criticism he's made regarding the f.h.a. we have stood together trying to cause the housing industry to work much better than it is for not just those trying to purchase homes but obviously the american taxpayer that he just alluded to. but i want to also point out something that was just said. the reason -- one of the main reasons the f.h.a. is in the problem it's in is the loans that were made in 2006, 2007, and 2008, long before this nominee was there. and i agree that this nominee needs to be more aggressive in making changes
acknowledged as being some that are really quite great. there happens to be -- i happened to see her walking in -- my 4th grade teacher is here, mrs. kay, now mrs. harris. when i was in school, they did something, and it dawned op me they don't do it anymore. when i was in elementary school, they had the library patrol. i had a button, and i was on patrol. talk about other programs. >> one of the programs i love is drop everything and read where for one period every day or several days a week, the whom school just reads. everybody just -- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are
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